Sunday, October 24, 2010

Ready for Halloween



How's that for a scary looking pair of front doors. Depending on how much I get done this week, they may still look like that a week from now.



I stripped off the paint and what you are seeing are the remnants of the original paint job from 1895. I think it was black with gray or maybe black, gray and red. There is some red on the trim around the panels that is very early. There was also the brown paint from the 20s and then finally the green from a decade ago. Once again the green paint that was applied over the other, failing paint jobs was what caused much of the work. Sometimes doing nothing really is better.



I did the panel on the interior to finish off the mail slow. This hides the wood I had to add when I went from the wider, modern mail slot to the narrower, antique slot.



This is the other side. Next up sand and paint, which would be easy except I need to decide on the color scheme. It will most likely end up being the 3 shades of green I used on most of the rest of the house. That would be Basil, Clarey Sage, and Livable Green. The question is, do I highlight with the fired brick that I used on the water table, crown molding, and window sash.

13 comments:

Kathy from NJ said...

YES!

Adam said...

There is something to be said about a door that pops a little. A lot of times the front door will be a different color from the rest of the house, to draw the eye. Maybe not red in this case, but perhaps drawing from the original scheme will provide inspiration.

Omar said...

Actually I think it would look really nice with the original combo, black/grey. Ever thought of keeping a similar scheme on the doors?

Greg said...

I agree, having a front door in contrast to the rest of the house does work a lot of times. I love the look of a bright red door on a white colonial revival home.

I'm not sure what the right color would be, though. The black and gray doesn't really sit well with me. Doing the monochromatic green, like the rest of the house, is the easy way out.

Hayduke said...

That is a scary looking door for sure. No trick-or-treaters will be coming near it.

Karen Anne said...

There's a special place in hell for people who use the word pop in the context of house design. Sorry :-) Just my two cents :-)

River Watson said...

looking GOOD! you did a great job fixing up the mail slot. I say break out the fired brick for the front door. because it is just so inviting to have a warm-colored door on an old house. I love my heavy oak door and all, but if it wasn't such a gorgeous wood I would simply HAVE to paint it a rusty orange.

purejuice said...

oh, don't do green! there's all kinds of gorgeous colors that go with green.
gold/ochre
violet
teal
sienna
coral/vermilion
black
cobalt
khaki
very warm beige/cream
creamy violet hot pink
creamy orange
canary yellow
purple

Greg said...

I am leaning away from greens, but the real issue now is weather. We've gotten 2 storms back-to-back and it is tough to get anything done on them.

Maybe a deep maroon?

Greg

purejuice said...

ergh, i don't know what you mean by maroon. burgundy? it would have to be more purple than brown (purple/brown is a whole universe, you understand) to make it sing.

Greg said...

Describing any color with words can be tough. Instead, I'll point you to a Wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maroon_(color)

purejuice said...

i'd go for bright maroon, rich maroon or up maroon. or a real marron -- chestnut.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maroon_(color)#Tones_of_maroon_color_comparison_chart

Greg said...

Maroon or Up Maroon where what I had in mind, but too late, it's green now. Actually, it is 3 shades of green. The same three I used on the bulk of the house: Clarey Sage, Basil, and Livable Green.

Pictures to follow.