Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Vintage Bath Photos & Snow Art

I found some vintage bath photos on-line. These are a little late for my house, but not so late that I can’t use some of them for ideas. The top 6 are from the 1904 Standard catalog, and the bottom 4 are from the 1925 Kohler catalog.

First, notice the size of the rooms from the first 4 from 1904. Obviously, these bathrooms were not designed for small houses. They even put the toilet in a separate little room. In the last one from 1925, notice how the sink faucet and levers are attached to the wall. Put a vessel sink under it and it would look a lot like a very modern design. I also like the way all of the plumbing seems to be contained in the large bump-out with the sink, tub, and toilet on opposing walls. Just think how easy it would be to fix plumbing problems if you had access to the bump-out from the other side.

Finally, there is the snow art. What can I say, these are timeless classics and I’m a bit of a sentimentalist for the season. {sigh}












Snow Art



More Snow Art to come over the next few days.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Greg, thanks for posting the Calvin 'toons. They always bring a smile.

Anonymous said...

hey, i didn't know bathrooms were so big back then! kinda like the mcmansion brs today. thanks for sharing the ideas.

merideth said...

wow! look at the location of the tp in the kohler one that's third from the bottom...that stresses me out just looking at it!

Greg said...

More Snow Art coming....

Those bathrooms are almost bland compared others from the late 19th Century I've seen.

And, yea, that is a bit of a reach, isn't it.

STAG said...

I saw a "flip this house" episode t'other day where they built a niche into the wall, installed a claw foot tub and an arched stained glass window. That designer must's seen these drawings!

Di said...

I don't know if this is true or not, but I remember hearing somewhere that you can't truly judge vintage bathrooms from the advertising pictures. The ads would often have more fixtures (bidet, sitz bath, cage shower) than a typical bathroom. For example, an average 1915 bathroom might only be 5' by 8', but the ads from that time period show rooms with 5 fixtures. I guess advertising hasn't changed much, always showing the idea rather than the norm. Just something to keep in mind!

Greg said...

I think you are absolutely right. Those full bathrooms with all the bells and whistles were only in mansions of the very rich. I read some where that Standard offered a full bath for around $45 in 1910 or so. I can guarantee you that did not come with a bidet.